Global Ed Con 2014 Session Review

Escuela Nueva: Quality Education for Peace and Democracy

Vicky Colbert

Founder and Director

Javeriana University, Colombia

  • Local, rural innovation that has grown into a national model that impacts more than 20,000 schools
  • National policy in Vietnam, Zambia, Colombia,
  • What is Escuela Nueva?
    • The process of installing change
    • Guarantees access, quality and relevance of basic education
    • Public-private partnership, civil society to spur innovation, and government to provide and push the scale of change
    • Integrates a systemic and cost effective curriculum, in-service training and follow-up,
    • Administrative and community strategies for school success
  • What does Escuela Nueva promote?
    • Child-centered, active, participatory and cooperative learning
    • Different learning paces, flexible promotion mechanisms, the national curriculum has been made into modules of mastery so students can complete them at their own pace
    • A new role for teachers, facilitator, HOTS inducer, catalyst for thinking
    • Effective, experiential teacher training, that modeled the pedagogy in the classroom with the teachers, hands-on training
    • Collaboration and networking of teaching professionals
    • Strong school, family and community relationships, w/o a ton of meetings!
    • Emphasis on democratic behavior through student governments
    • New generation of self-paced, self-directed, reusable learning guides that incorporate both content and methodology (Flexible and personalized) The textbook, workbook and teacher’s guide all in one.
      • Learning Corners
      • Small group and pair dialoguing
      • Creating community maps to identify the relationship between the school and the child’s home
      • The lessons are relevant to families and their lives and are translated to the families through the children (similar to popular education?)

 

Five Escuela Nueva takeaways:

  1. Yes, it is possible to improve the quality of education and learning in the poorest schools
  2. More of the same is not enough – it requires a paradigm shift in pedagogy
  3. Find a systemic innovative approach
  4. Learning should go beyond just academic achievement, fostering social-competencies, 21st century skills, and peaceful democratic behaviors is equally important
  5. Technology triggers change, but a new pedagogy is indispensable for effective learning

 

  • While everything has changed over the years, the way we learn has not, “most educational reform have been administrative in nature, while pedagogy has not”

 

Similarities and Differences between Latin America Low-income schools

and US Title I schools

Similarities Differences
Rigid calendars and evaluation systems Emphasis on memorization, not comprehension
Weak school-community relationships Teacher-centered methods
Low self-esteem of children Insufficient learning time
Low academic achievement Emphasis on Pre-K-3 education
High drop-out or retention rates
Ineffective or inadequate teacher training, pre-service

The Escuela Nueva Comprehensive, Systemic Approach:

  1. Teachers had to be able to execute the pedagogy, the teaching and learning, even in the jungles of Colombia
  2. It had to be politically viable within a strong teacher union society, so the teachers had to be the actors and leaders for change
  3. The program had to be cost-effective or you could not have a large impact
  4. Rethink the classroom, the way of learning and the education system as a whole

Escuela Nueva model

Escuela Nueva Results:

  1. Comparative Study on Democratic Behavior in Guatemala showed that Escuela Nueva students more frequently took turns talking or participating in an activity, and also more frequently lead processes
  2. Enhances girl’s participation, self-esteem and leadership skills

“None of us alone is as smart as all of us together.” ~Francois Taddei, Descartes University

Vision: By 2018 Escuela Nueva desires to be a “global technical reference for active, cooperative and personalized learning” and they want to lead a “global movement” to improve lives via their educational model.

Urban Escuela Activa: They expanded their model to urban areas in 1988 when there was a rapid urbanization in Colombia

Escuela Nueva Learning Circles: A specialized program for displaced-migrant population in Colombia. In these schools the students need specialized services that are flexible and adaptable to their unique needs.

  • Community youth agents serve as tutors in the schools:

→ They serve groups of 10-15 multi-grade students in the Learning Circles

→ They also ensure sustainability for the teachers in these poor urban schools

that experience extremely high rates of teacher turnover

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