Part II: Design in Education

There are a number of resources on the web to help teachers and administrators get started using design principles and processes to address challenges or opportunities in their schools and classrooms. Here are a few that I have stumbled across in my informal study of design.

First, when I think of design, I think like most people I think of the aesthetic or structural variety. And in many ways there is a powerful way in which architecture, ergonomic engineering and visual design can have profound of effects on learning and school environments. Indeed, there is a body of brain-based education research which emphasizes environmental design elements such as lighting, scents and sounds, and classroom configuration as major ways to leverage our natural neurological predilections for learning.

In this endearing TED Talk by Japanese architect, Takaharu Tezuka, he showcases an oval open plan preschool he designed and where his own child attends. He explains a bit about the process he went through to design for the end-user, both the teachers and the students of the school, and how he included input from both groups during that design process. The space is an urban preschool paradise, with wonderful natural light, open spaces, tight cubicles, trees growing out of the classrooms, and practical multi-use, storage-rich learning stations. It is an amazing organic space for young learners.

Next are a few web resources to both learn more about design in the classroom specifically and design education in general. As mentioned in Part I of my design series, the TD4ED organization is leading the way on adapting the design process for schools and engaging districts and charter organizations in its use. They have tweaked IDEO’s Human-centered Design process for schools, renaming and retooling the six steps to reflect the student end-user; define, imagine, explore, play, reflect and transform. The steps are reminiscent of the gradual release method that many teachers know and use today in their classroom.

If you are looking to connect with other teachers and schools who have already implemented design thinking or a design solution, the Design Thinking in Schools website has searchable map of worldwide resources and programs. You will find pins for the famed design schools like INNOVA in Peru, a whole cluster in Silicon Valley close to the IDEO headquarters and even a few in my home city of Seattle. Check it out and see if you can find and visit a design-forward school in your area.

Lastly, here a few more resource websites and Twitter handles to follow to round out your design in education education:

edSurge – This is their collection of resources to get schools, teachers and ed leaders to start using design thinking in their education communities without hiring an expensive consultant.

Design Education, California – This site is for design students and professionals, but is a resource rich clearinghouse for any interested potential design educator. (@designeducation)

Design In Schools Pinterest – Check out and follow my design board as I continue my professional development on design in education.

Intrinsic School Chicago – Read a Q&A with the lead architect of this revolutionary blended learning space and how they approached their design process with the end-users (students and teachers) in mind.

Biophilic Design in Schools – Stephen Kellert of the Yale School of Foresty and Environmental Studies on how to build nature into education.

@cooperhewitt – The Smithsonian’s design museum provides summer camps for kids interested in design.

@sawhorserevolu1 – A Seattle-based nonprofit working with high school students to design and build solutions for homelessness.

@ProjectHDesign – A 501c3 nonprofit teaching youth to design and build their future with heart, hands, and hammers.

@schoolstartup – The handle for Will Eden, former teacher and edtech expert now leading the launch of a Next Generation School in Alpha Public Schools, San Jose, CA.

@TeachersGuild – A beta community from IDEO and Riverdale School District to get teachers collaborating on design thinking for education with other teachers.

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